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Wild Pigeon Dreaming by Harold Payne Mpetyane

Warning: This website includes images and names of deceased people that may cause distress to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

 

Traditional pieces such as this 90cm x 45cm panel by the late Harold Payne also tell specific stories with their symbolism. Painted by Ilkawerne elder, this piece denotes wild pigeon tracks; white arrows are the pigeons walking on the sand and black ones are dried bush plums that have fallen from trees nearby Aremela, a sacred rock hole. What makes this piece extra special is its imperfections.    Wild Pigeon Dreaming by Harold Payne Mpetyane
90cm x 45cm
Synthetic polymer paint on canvas

     
Traditional pieces such as this 90cm x 45cm panel tell specific stories with their symbolism.

Painted by Ilkawerne elder, the late Harold Payne, this piece denotes wild pigeon tracks; white arrows symbolise wild pigeons walking on the sand and black ones on dried bush plums that have fallen from trees nearby Aremela, a sacred site containing rock waterholes. The concentric circles, in black and white, represent Aremela.

A handful of men from Ilkawerne paint this story whom were taught the symbolism, story, songs, ceremony and significance by Harold, including his son Johnny Payne Ngale. 

Harold was married to Doreen Payne, Lena Pwerle's daughter, and they had six children together. Alongside elder Lindsay Bird Mpetyane, Harold was an elder of Ilkawerne country and with that came the responsibility of initiating other countrymen and proactively teaching the stories and cultural lore of Ilkawerne. He had a keen sense of humour and empowered presence that contributed to his natural leadership abilities. Harold was also a sculptor and painter, choosing to paint olden time stories as well as a select number of Dreaming stories he wished to share.



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